Student Resources

Animal Studies Graduate Students

Left to right: Kelly O'Brien, Seven Mattes, Marie Carmen Abney, Sandy Burnley, Cadi Fung, Stephen Vrla, Mark Suchyta

(not pictured: Meghan Charters, Seohyun Kim, Monica List, Jessica Rizzolo, Stacy Rule, Aimee Swenson, Jonathan Thurston,


Social Media | Organizations | Journals | Books and Special Editions |

Conferences and Programs | Funding | Jobs | Miscellaneous | Links


Social Media


Organizations


Journals

  • Zeitschrift für Kritische Tierstudien is an inter- and multidisciplinary peer-reviewed journal. The first volume will be published in December 2018.

    Authors include both junior researchers and established specialists in Human Animal Studies, as well as activists of the Animal Liberation and Total Liberation Movement, who are pursuing an emancipatory, abolitionist, critical, non-reformist approach. Zeitschrift für Kritische Tierstudienaims to proceed, together with other liberation movements, intersectionally against existing systems of power and any form of suppression.

    Zeitschrift für Kritische Tierstudien is a german medium that also accepts contributions in english. In order to maintain scientific standards, submitted articles are assessed in an anonymous peer review process.

    Accepted contributions submitted by May 31 will be published in December of the same year. Manuscripts with a volume of up to 50,000 characters can now be submitted as .doc, .docx, .rtf, or .odt files under the email address kritischeTierstudien@gmx.de.

    Dr. Daniel Lau (Editor)

  • Animals
    • Animals is an international and interdisciplinary scholarly open access journal. It publishes original research articles, reviews, communications, and short notes that are relevant to any field of study that involves animals, including zoology, ethnozoology, animal science, animal ethics and animal welfare. However, preference will be given to those articles that provide an understanding of animals within a larger context (i.e., the animals' interactions with the outside world, including humans). There is no restriction on the length of the papers. Our aim is to encourage scientists to publish their experimental and theoretical research in as much detail as possible. Full experimental details and/or method of study, must be provided for research articles. Articles submitted that involve subjecting animals to unnecessary pain or suffering will not be accepted, and all articles must be submitted with the necessary ethical approval.
  • Animal Sentience
    • Animal Sentience is a brand new, peer-reviewed, pluridisciplinary online journal on animal feelings. No subscription or publication fees. Accepted articles will be accorded Open Peer Commentary across disciplines. As an interdisciplinary journal, ASent will be of interest to all who are concerned with the current empirical findings on what, when and how nonhuman animals feel, along with the practical, methodological, legal, ethical, sociological, theological and philosophical implications of the findings.
  • Animal Studies Journal
    • Animal Studies Journal, the new online scholarly journal of the Australian Animal Studies Group, provides a forum for current research in human-animal Studies. ASJ publishes international cross-disciplinary content with a particular, but not exclusive, interest in Australian, New Zealand and Asia-Pacific scholarship. The journal, which is published twice yearly, is fully refereed (double-blind peer reviewed) and open access. ASJ publishes inquiring and critical academic work by both new and established scholars whose work focuses on animals and human relationships with other animals. The journal aims to be a leading international forum for the dissemination and discussion of animal studies research and creative work.
  • Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture
    • Over its first two years of activity, Antennae has become an influential resource of academic relevance within the fast growing field of animal and environmental studies, acting as receiver and amplifier of relevant topics, as expressed by the connections between the subject of nature and the multidisciplinary field of visual culture.
  • Anthrozoos: A Multidisciplinary Journal of the Interactions of People and Animals
    • Anthrozoös is a quarterly, peer-reviewed publication whose focus is to report the results of studies, from a wide array of disciplines, on the interactions of people and animals. Academic disciplines represented include anthropology, archaeozoology, art and literature, education, ethology, history, human medicine, psychology, sociology and veterinary medicine.
  • Environmental Humanities
    • Environmental Humanities is an international, open-access journal that aims to invigorate current interdisciplinary research on the environment. In response to a growing interest around the world in the many questions that arise in this era of rapid environmental and social change, the journal publishes outstanding scholarship that draws humanities disciplines into conversation with each other, and with the natural and social sciences.
  • Human-Animal Interaction Bulletin
    • Announcing the new open access, online, peer-reviewed Human-Animal Interaction Bulletin, devoted to the dissemination of research in the field of the interaction between non-human animals and their human counterparts. The mission of HAIB is to bring together researchers, academicians, clinicians/practitioners, and scholarly students working in different areas for the advancement of the human-animal interaction field.
  • Human Ecology Review
    • Human Ecology Review is a refereed journal published twice a year by the Society for Human Ecology. The journal publishes peer-reviewed research and theory on the interaction between humans and the environment and other links between culture and nature (Research in Human Ecology), essays and applications relevant to human ecology (Human Ecology Forum), book reviews (Contemporary Human Ecology), and relevant commentary, announcements, and awards (Human Ecology Bulletin).
  • Humanimalia: A Journal of Human/Animal Interface Studies
    • The study of human/animal relationships is connected to questions ranging from postcolonial politics (land struggles among Western “animal tourists,” indigenous people in underdeveloped areas, and the endangered species), through philosophy (acknowledging how “the animal” has functioned as the other to “the human,” both historically malleable and politically charged categories), to the study of art and literature (examining how the animal image expresses cultural assumptions). As editors of Humanimalia, we believe there is a need for a journal that brings together scholarship on these questions from a wide range of disciplines and perspectives, and creates opportunities for further exchanges of ideas. We believe also that our knowledge about the intricate relationships among human and non-human animals should not be rigidly restricted to established conventions of scholarly study and polemical argument, conventions that in their exclusive claims to validity have contributed to the objectification of relationships in which human observers are profoundly implicated.
  • Journal of Animal Ethics
    • Journal of Animal Ethics is the first named journal of animal ethics in the world. It is devoted to the exploration of progressive thought about animals. It is multidisciplinary in nature and international in scope. It covers theoretical and applied aspects of animal ethics -- of interest to academics from the humanities and the sciences, as well as professionals working in the field of animal protection. JAE is published by the University of Illinois Press in partnership with the Ferrater Mora Oxford Centre for Animal Ethics. The aim of the Centre is to pioneer ethical perspectives on animals through academic research, teaching, and publication.
  • Journal of Animal and Natural Resource Law
    • Journal of Animal and Natural Resource Law seeks to explore the legal and public policy issues surrounding animals and natural resources at all levels of government: local, state, national, comparative national and international. All perspectives are welcome. JANRL will be web-published in its entirety, but hard print copy shall also be available.
  • Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science
    • Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science publishes articles, commentaries, and brief research reports on methods of experimentation, husbandry, and care that demonstrably enhance the welfare of all nonhuman animals. For administrative purposes, manuscripts are categorized into the following four content areas: welfare issues arising in laboratory, farm, companion animal, and wildlife/zoo settings. Manuscripts of up to 8,000 words are accepted that present new empirical data or a re-evaluation of available data, conceptual or theoretical analysis, or demonstrations relating to some issue of animal welfare science. The editors also encourage submission of brief research reports and commentaries. In addition, JAAWS publishes letters, announcements of meetings, news, and book reviews. Unsolicited submissions of such articles are welcome.
  • Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences
    • Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences offers a venue where relevant interdisciplinary research, practice and public policies can be recognized and evaluated. Increasingly, environmental studies integrate many different scientific and professional disciplines. Thus the journal seeks to set a rigorous, credible standard for specifically interdisciplinary environmental research. JESS is the official publication of the newly formed Association of Environmental Sciences and Studies.
  • Otherness: Essays and Studies
    • Via ‘Otherness: Essays & Studies’, we seek to publish research articles from and across different academic disciplines that examine, in as many ways as possible, the concepts of otherness and alterity. As such, we now offer an outlet for the dissemination of such research into otherness and aim to provide an open and active forum for academic discussion. We particularly appreciate dynamic cross-disciplinary study. We envisage that forthcoming issues of the journal will relate to topics within the context of Otherness studies and members and colleagues of the Centre are welcome to propose research ideas and themes for more focused studies.
  • Politics and Animals
    • Politics and Animals is a peer-reviewed, open access journal that explores the human-animal relationship from the vantage point of political science and political theory. It hosts international, multidisciplinary research and debate—conceptual and empirical—on the consequences and possibilities that human-animal relations have for politics and vice versa.
  • Relations. Beyond Anthropocentrism
    • Relations. Beyond Anthropocentrism is a peer-refereed open access journal of trans-anthropocentric ethics and related inquires. The main aim of the journal is to create a professional interdisciplinary forum in Europe to discuss moral and scientific issues that concern the increasing need of going beyond narrow anthropocentric paradigms in all fields of knowledge. The journal accepts submissions on all topics which promote European research adopting a non-anthropocentric ethical perspective on both interspecific and intraspecific relationships between all life species—humans included—and between these and the abiotic environment.
  • Sloth: A Journal of Emerging Voices in Human-Animal Studies
    • Sloth is an online bi-annual journal that publishes international, multi-disciplinary writing by undergraduate students and recent (within three years) graduates that deals with human/non-human animal relationships from the perspectives of the social sciences, the humanities, and the natural sciences. Sloth showcases the important and innovative contributions of undergraduates, giving those who are interested in human/non-human animal relationships a way to contribute to and engage with the field, as well as an opportunity to build their skills, knowledge, and resumes in anticipation of their graduate school careers.
  • Society & Animals: Journal of Human-Animal Studies
    • Since 1993 and in conjunction with the internationally recognized Brill, ASI produces Society & Animals, published six times per year and containing peer reviewed studies concerning nonhuman animals from psychology, sociology, anthropology, political science and other social sciences and history, literary criticism, and other disciplines of the humanities. Recent articles suggest the scope of the journal: Dolphins in Popular Literature and Media; More than a Furry Companion: The Ripple Effect of Companion Animals on Neighborhood Interactions and Sense of Community; and An Investigation into the Association between the Witnessing of Animal Abuse and Adolescents' Behavior toward Animals.

Books and Special Editions

  • Configurations, the journal of SLSA (The Society for Literature, Science, and the Arts) is seeking submissions for a special issue on Science Studies and the Blue Humanities, edited by Stacy Alaimo. The editors are interested in essays, position papers, provocations, and artist statements that explore the significance of science studies for the development of the blue humanities. As oceans and bodies of fresh water increasingly become sites for environmentally-oriented arts and humanities scholarship, how can the emerging blue humanities best engage with the theories, questions, paradigms, and methods of science studies? How do questions of scale, temporality, materiality, and mediation emerge in aquatic zones and modes? How can literature, art, data visualization, and digital media best respond to the rapidly developing sciences of ocean acidification and climate change as well as the less publicized concerns such as the effect of military sonar on cetaceans? Work on postcolonial/decolonial science studies, Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK), indigenous sciences, and citizen science especially welcome. Please submit 5,000-7,000 word essays; 3,000 word position papers or provocations; or 2,000 word artist statements (with one or two illustrations or a link to a digital work); to Stacy Alaimo, alaimo@uta.edu, by February 1, 2018, for consideration. All essays will be peer-reviewed.

     

  • CFP: Relationships with Humans and Animals in the Middle East and North Africa Region

    Middle East Studies Association Call for Papers

    Shareable link: https://equinehistory.wordpress.com/2018/01/15/cfp-relationships-with-humans-and-animals-i...

         Humans and other animals share spaces, impact each other daily through work and leisure, and create communities together. Levi Strauss is famous for saying animals are “good to think with.” As anthropology is beginning to make the post-humanist or animal turn, it is time to think about how animals affect and create each other and humans in various symbolic and material ways, constantly crossing and redrawing communal, ethical, and practical boundaries. Tim Mitchell writes about “making the mosquito speak”, and how these small malaria-carrying animals had an impact on the outcome between the British and German forces during the Second World War in Egypt. Scholars have gradually asked questions about the human-animals in the West or Global North, but what about the Global South, specifically the Middle East and North Africa (MENA)?

         Animals of any size are on the fringes of the human world, but play important and interesting roles in the various cultures of the MENA. Horses and falcons enjoy valorization and continued elevated status of “noble” creatures, are bought and sold for thousands of dollars, thus leading to their own industry in terms of racing, breeding, hunting, and other elite leisure pursuits. Donkeys and mules in Fes, Morocco continue to be of vital importance carrying items up and down the winding streets of the old city, which are two narrow and steep for cars and most motorcycles. Native snakes are continually needed for the snake charming tourist acts in Marrakesh. The Arabian oryx was hunted to extinction in the wild, reintroduced, and is the national animal of Jordan, Oman, UAE, Bahrain and Qatar. Whale and dolphin watching tours are a popular activity in Oman. ISIS fighters used the Mosul Zoo as a staging area in October 2016.  The zoo saw severe losses and the final two animals were evacuated in April 2017. Animals are constantly in the crosshairs of society, conflict, cultural meanings, sports, and leisure pursuits. This panel invites papers addressing the status of animals in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) through history, anthrozoology, anthropology, political science, geography, and other relevant disciplines.

         The animals in this region pervade almost every aspect of culture and history. This panel asks: what is the human-animal relationship in the MENA region, how are animals used and viewed, how are animals (livestock, pets, sporting animals, wildlife) treated and what are the attitudes toward them. This panel will examine this interchange of animals in cultures past and present. Papers focusing on single countries, regions or comparative studies examining multiple locales or countries are welcome, as are papers from any single or combined disciplinary perspectives. 

         Authors are asked to submit a paper title, abstract (300-400 words), their professional or institutional affiliation, and contact information. Academic, non-academic, or other professional authors are invited to apply. In cases of co-authored works, only one submission (including the same information for each author) should be made. Papers will be accepted in English only. The deadline for abstract submissions is midnight 31 January 2018. You will be informed of the result by 2 February 2018.

         If the proposal is accepted, you will be required to register with MESA by 15 February 2018, although acceptance of the panel by MESA is not assured. Please consult the MESA websitefor further information about conference and registration procedures.

         We look forward to receiving your proposal, which you should send to guj.talley@gmail.com Please include MESA in the email title.

         We intend to publish the papers in a collective book, so strong preference will be given to authors/speakers who will subsequently be prepared to submit their papers by 15 January 2019.

  • CALL FOR PAPERS For a Book of Essays on Our Animals/Ourselves: The Blurred Line  Between Human and Animal in Popular Culture

    Anthropomorphization permeates modern popular culture in examples as familiar as Disney’s depiction of animals to moral lessons from children’s literature to our cultural preoccupations with internet cats. Increasingly, however, forms and adaptations of anthropomorphization are extending how this concept is expressed and blurring the lines between animal and human in significant ways. A multi-billion dollar pet product industry is driven by the growing view of pets as full family members. Cosmetic surgery, once reserved for humans, is now being done on dogs. Futuristic science fiction scenarios are becoming bioengineered reality. And where does the “furry” trend fit in?

    Using the lens of popular culture, this book examines the significance of these social constructs surrounding the complexities of the human-animal relationship. Contributions will address how and why the traits and characteristics we ascribe to animals have significant consequences by shaping our relationships with animals and other humans, our understandings of ourselves and what it means to be human, and the consequences of these representations for the nonhuman animals who share this world. As behaviors, roles, and expectations that used to be reserved for humans now apply to animals, are lines between human and animal being obfuscated? How are animals becoming, and being treated, more like humans, and to a lesser degree, how are humans becoming more like animals? How are animals becoming extensions of people’s identities? How are media facilitating this? Simply put, in many ways, this is not so much a book about animals but a book about us–and the ways we regard animals.

    Our Animals/Ourselves: The Blurred Line Between Human and Animal in Popular Culture will be published by McFarland & Co. It will include approximately twenty chapters. In general, papers should be ten to twenty-five, double-spaced pages and follow the current MLA Style Manual with in-text citations. Notes and works cited should appear at the end. Interdisciplinary work is welcomed. Chapters may include, but are not limited to, the following topics:

    Advertising To, About, and Using Animals
    Animals as Extensions of Human Identity (e.g., as personal or political statement, as fashion, etc.)
    Animals and the Family (e.g., we increasingly treat them like human family members)
    Animals as Persons/Personhood (includes ties to animal rights movements)
    Animals, variously as Images in Art, in Children’s Literature, in Film and TV
    Body modifications: of animal bodies that treat them like humans such as cosmetic surgery, and of human bodies to make them more like animals, and the “furry” trend
    Case Studies of Real-life Anthropomorphized Animals and Animal-Human Intersections – examples: Pedals the bear; Toast and Finn’s dog wedding; Nano, the human woman who identifies as a cat
    Disneyfication
    Hero Animals and Criminal Animals
    The Internet and Animals
    Meanings and Consequences of Popular Perceptions of Specific Animals – examples: horses, dinosaurs, spiders
    Pet Product Industry (the more we anthropomorphize animals, the more we buy them human stuff)
    Science Fiction and Anthropomorphized Animals (including uplift, human-animal boundaries and ethics, and futuring)
    Transmigration (pulls in symbols, religion, and mythology)

    Inquiries and submissions should be sent to any of the following editors:

    Kathy Merlock Jackson, Ph.D.
    Professor of Communication
    Virginia Wesleyan University
    1584 Wesleyan Drive
    Norfolk, VA 23502
    Phone: (757) 455-3308
    kmjackson@vwu.edu

    Kathy Shepherd Stolley
    Professor of Sociology
    Virginia Wesleyan University
    1584 Wesleyan Drive
    Norfolk, VA 23502
    Phone: (757) 233-8768
    kstolley@vwu.edu

    Lisa Lyon Payne, Ph.D.
    Associate Professor of Communication
    Virginia Wesleyan University
    1584 Wesleyan Drive
    Norfolk, VA 23502
    Phone: (757) 455-3109
    lpayne@vwu.edu

    Find and share this CFP online: ouranimalsourselves.wordpress.com

    Accepting proposals now.

    Completed articles due August 1, 2018.

  • CALL FOR PAPERS: Tabula Rasa Issue 30 (JUNE 2019)

    SOCIAL SCIENCE JOURNAL

    Zoo anthropologies: the animal question

     Which place do animals occupy in contemporary social theory? In the last few decades, popular culture and the movements for animal rights have provided evidence of the political implications of the status endured by non-human animals. This has in turn shown a gap in social theoretical thinking about the place of animals within human society. In this context, post-humanist approaches in cultural studies, social studies on science, environmental philosophy, and anthropology, raise concerns about the intrinsic anthropocentrism in modern humanism, closely articulated to manifold racial and gender power asymmetries. Once the historic and situational character of human condition has been made evident, it is necessary to underline the constitutive co-becoming of the human species along with other species.

    We happen to be what we are by virtue of the relational materialities that make us up, which includes non-human animal species, and in general, the varied eco-systems in Earth. On the other hand, the outcomes of scientific research, from cognitive ethology, geography and animal ecology increasingly blur the limits between human animal and non-human animal cognitive abilities, as long as they both share differentiating features, such as reflection and response abilities.

    This issue of Tabula Rasa aims to receive contributions addressing the animal issue from humanities and social sciences perspectives. Daily life scenarios, such as species conservation practices, the use of animals in laboratories, polemics around meat industry, conservation approaches at zoos, human animal and non-human animal relationships, as pets, and so on, open the possibility of a fruitful dialogue between natural sciences, social sciences and humanities.

    Thus, building on a perspective addressing multi-species assamblages, we suggest the following questions to advance this debate: How do social and cultural practices emerge from the relationships between multiple species? What histories of capital networks have taken animal forms of life to extinction, and to enforce new precariousness scenarios? Which questions are pertinent to carry out social research that takes animal response ability into account? What is the rationale underlying animal abuse and abandonment in human social settings, where companion animals are used and abused, but are also a target of their cruelty?

    Lastly, which care practices and forms of obligation (ethical-political) are applicable to a world on the verge of extinction?

    Deadline for manuscript receipt February 28, 2019 info@revistatabularasa.org

    Guest editors:

    Juan Camilo Cajigas, University of California, Davis. jcajigas@ucdavis.edu

    Santiago Martínez, Universidad de los Andes. s.martinez65@uniandes.edu.co

    Leonardo      Montenegro,       Universidad      Colegio       Mayor       de      Cundinamarca. l.montenegro@revistatabularasa.org


Conferences and Programs

  • CFP RGS-IBG 2018: 'Excavating multispecies landscapes: temporalities, materialities and the more-than-human Anthropocene'

    by Charlotte Wrigley

    Call for papers: RGS-IBG Annual International Conference, Cardiff University, 28–31 August 2018

    Excavating multispecies landscapes: temporalities, materialities and the more-than-human Anthropocene

    Session organisers: Aurora Fredriksen (University of Manchester) and Charlotte Wrigley (Queen Mary, University of London) 

    Along with eroding coastlines (Matless 2017) and the ‘blasted’ ruins of capitalist development (Tsing 2017), nonhuman beings are key signals of the Anthropocene in landscapes. Changing migration patterns, novel colonisations, extinctions, adaptive mutations and hybridisations make legible the material transformation of landscapes through melting ice, warming seas, desertification, toxification. The current or threatened absence of once present species fold in remembered, forgotten and imagined pasts and alternately apocalyptic and redemptive futures into a present of haunted, spectral landscapes (e.g., Whale and Ginn 2017; Gan et al 2017: G1). This is evident in popular imaginaries of the Anthropocene as human induced environmental catastrophe – in visions of a ‘silent spring’ (Carson 1962), ‘insectageddon’ (Monbiot 2017), and coral reef ‘graveyards’ and ‘ghost towns’ – that foreground the absence of once present nonhuman beings in beloved landscapes. It is also evident in projections for a so-called ‘good Anthropocene’ that envision a near future in which technoscientific progress and human ingenuity are able to ‘turn back time’ and/or alter the future by returning long absent nonhuman species to landscapes through restoration, rewilding or de-extinction initiatives. As the Anthropocene invites a reassessment of humanity’s place in the geologic timescale, nonhumans become intricately entangled in these shifting temporalities: cryobanks stash endangered species’ DNA as a future safeguard against extinctions (Chrulew 2017) whilst melting ice reveals prehistoric carcasses and thousands of years of fossilised climate data. 

    Beyond total absence or abundant presence, there are smaller, sometimes stranger ways that nonhuman beings make the Anthropocene legible in landscapes: old trees calling out in flower for symbiont animal pollinators that are now absent, signalling a loss of synchronous time and cascading transformations of place (Rose 2012); hybrid polar-grizzly bears wandering the edge of exposed shores once covered in ice extending out to sea; a type of bacteria found only in the rectums of geese digesting toxic waste from mines (Hird and Yusoff 2018); and long dormant microbiotic pathogens from the deep past re-emerging as permafrost melts in arctic landscapes. In these and many other possible examples, carefully attending to the signs writ into landscapes by nonhuman beings can unsettle anthropocentric narratives of the Anthropocene centred on the history of Modern (western) humanity and its future dissolution or redemption, calling forth more ambivalent, multivocal narratives of multispecies worldings in flux (DeLoughrey 2015).

    This session invites contributions that engage with the ways in which nonhuman beings signal the Anthropocene in landscapes. Potential themes include (but are not limited to):

    • Changing and novel nonhuman agencies in response to the material transformation of landscapes

    • Absence/presence of nonhumans and folded temporalities in haunted/spectral landscapes

    • Landscapes as multispecies worldings 

    • More-than-human affects in landscape encounters

    • Speculative futures for more-than-human landscapes

    • Transmogrification and monstrous landscapes

    We especially encourage contributions that unsettle anthropocentric and/or occidental readings of the Anthropocene in landscapes.

    Please send abstracts of no more than 250 words to aurora.fredriksen@manchester.ac.uk and c.a.wrigley@qmul.ac.uk by 5 February 2018.

     References:

    Carson, R. (1962) Silent Spring. New York: Houghton Mifflin. 

    Chrulew, M. (2017) “Freezing the Ark: The Cryopolitics of Endangered Species Preservation” in J. Radin and E. Kowal (eds.) Cryopolitics: Frozen Life in a Melting World, 283–305. Cambridge: The MIT Press.  

    DeLoughrey, E. (2015) ‘Ordinary futures: interspecies worldings in the Anthropocene’ in Global Ecologies and the Environmental Humanities: Postcolonial Approaches, edited by E. DeLoughrey, J. Didur, A. Carrigan. London: Routledge.

    Hird, M. and Yusoff, K. (2018) [forthcoming] ‘Traversing Plateaus in Microbial-Mineral Relation’. The American Association of Geographers: Annual MeetingApril 10-14, New Orleans. 

    Gan, E., Tsing, A., Swanson, H., Bubandt, N. (2017) ‘Haunted landscapes of the Anthropocene’ in A. Tsing, H, Swanson, E Gan and N. Bubandt (eds) Arts of Living on a Damaged Planet. Minneapolis: Minnesota. 

    Whale, H. and Ginn, F. (2017) “In the Absence of Sparrows.” In A. Cunsolo and K. Landman (eds) Mourning Nature: Hope at the Heart of Ecological Loss and Grief, 92–116. London: Routledge.

    Matless, D. (2017) ‘The Anthroposcenic’. Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers 42(3): 363–76. 

    Monbiot, G. (2017) ‘Insectageddon: Farming Is More Catastrophic than Climate Breakdown’. The GuardianOctober 20. URL:  http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/oct/20/insectageddon-farming-catastrophe-climate-breakdown-insect-populations.

    Rose, D. B. (2012) “Multispecies Knots of Ethical Time.” Environmental Philosophy, Special Issue “Temporal Environments: Rethinking Time and Ecology” 9 (1):127–40.

    Tsing, A. (2017) The Mushroom at the End of the World: On the Possibility of Life in Capitalist Ruins. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

  • CFP 2018 Bridging Gaps: Where is Ethical Glamour in Celebrity Culture?

    Centre for Media and Celebrity Studies (CMCS) 7th International Conference
    Bridging Gaps: Where is Ethical Glamour in Celebrity Culture?
    Lisbon, Portugal
    July 1 – 3, 2018

    CALL FOR PAPERS:

    The fashion modeling industry has occupied a significant area in celebrity culture. For the past forty decades, popular models, actors, authors, and athletes among many public figures have participated in photo shoots and runway shows, stylized their profile, and built their persona brand through visual and literary expressions of fashion. These expressions of fashion have played a key role in publicity and promotion of their brands. For fans, they are ‘role models’ who help constructing subjectivity and become objects of study, especially when it comes to beauty ideals and sexual objectification of the body. For Elizabeth Wissinger, the “glamour labour” involved in self-fashioning, surveillance, and branding is essential to production of consumer values and desire of bodies. However, is the labour sustainable from the perspective of social and environmental ethics?

    As Rebecca Oxford suggests, sustainability not only supports human beings but all other species in our ecosystem. Therefore, the idea of modeling in contemporary practices of eco-fashion intends to reflect care towards the quality of all life, respect human rights, promote biodiversity, and bring balance among all species. In fact, modeling should be inclusive of all shapes, postures, and voices in diverse sectors of work and leisure. The exploitative use of human labour, animal skin and fur, fossil fuel, and emission of polluting agents in the garment industry prompts us to redefine what it means to be an eco-model as opposed to a role model that excludes diverse bodies.

    How can we use academic study and cultural productions to expand traditional definitions and understandings of modeling? Can the body become a biological tool to re-fashion dominant notions of glamour?  Would the use of the body include voices of diverse abilities and, in the process, contest ableism, lookism, and speciesism in ethical fashion and glamour? Can the skin, as in the case of PETA nudists, become a particular text and be semiotically read in a way that accepts, negotiates or disrupts what it means to be a green glamour model in celebrity culture? Can newly defined green glamour models lead to much needed liberal and democratic practices in celebrity activism and studies of celebrity culture?

    The Centre for Media and Celebrity Studies (CMCS) Bridging Gaps conference, in association with sponsors Centre for Ecological, Social, and Informatics Cognitive Research (ESI.CORE) and WaterHill Publishing uses a reflective practice paradigm and asks an urgent question, “Where is Ethical Glamour in Celebrity Culture?” The conference problematizes what it means to be a “model” and invites academics, models, journalists, publicists, producers and guests to attend, speak and collaborate for research and development in the field of study.

    The format of the conference aims at being open and inclusive ranging from interdisciplinary academic scholars to practitioners involved in all areas of celebrity culture, fandom, fashion and journalism.  The conference combines paper presentations, workshop panels, roundtables, slideshows, and interviews that aim to bridge gaps in celebrity activism, persona branding, and fashion education. Working papers and media productions will be considered for the conference.

    Registration includes: Your printed package for the complete conference, professional development workshop, access to evening receptions, complimentary evening drinks, consideration for publication, and the CMCS $100 best paper and $100 best screen awards.

    Submission guidelines:

    • 250-word abstract or workshop / roundtable proposal
    • Include a title, your name, e-mail address, and affiliation if applicable
    • Submit to conference Chairs Dr Ana Jorge and Dr Samita Nandy at email address: celebstudies2018@gmail.com
    • Abstract submission deadline: January 31, 2018
    • Acceptance notification: February 28, 2018
    • Early bird deadline for hotel booking & conference registration: March 31, 2018
    • Conference reception and presentations: July 1-3, 2018

    Celebrity Chat Video Submissions:

    • Video length should be 10-20 minutes
    • Include a title, your name, e-mail address, and affiliation if applicable
    • Submit to Celebrity Chat producer Jackie Raphael at email address: celebstudies2018@gmail.com
    • Conference reception and presentations:  July 1-3, 2018

    Topics include but are not limited to:

    • Celebrity
    • Branding and persona
    • Publicity and promotion
    • Glamour, beauty, and luxury
    • Skin as text
    • Wardrobe malfunction and scandals
    • Ethical fashion
    • Sustainable clothing
    • Garment industry
    • Fair trade
    • Human rights
    • Animal rights
    • Environmental ethics
    • Green carpet
    • Interviews
    • News
    • Journalism
    • Social media and online fame
    • Audiences
    • Fandom
    • Fiction
    • Art history
    • Performance
    • Theory and methods
    • Research agenda
    • Business models
    • Ethics and morality
    • Cognition and memory
    • Media literacy
    • Social innovation
    • Education and advocacy
    • International relations
    • Community building
    • Business and community partnerships

    Conference Chairs: Dr Ana Jorge and Dr Samita Nandy
    Conference Committee: Dr Jackie Raphael, Dr Nicole Bojko and Kiera Obbard
    Conference URL: http://cmc-centre.com/conferences/lisbon2018/
    Conference E-mailcelebstudies2018@gmail.com

     

     

  • The Animals & Society Institute and the Center for Advanced Study at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign invite applications for the second annual Human-Animal Studies Summer Institute program for advanced graduate students and early career scholars pursuing research in Human-Animal Studies.  This interdisciplinary program follows up on the successful six-week summer fellowship program, started by the Animals & Society Institute in 2007.  This new program, inaugurated in 2017, is focused on graduate students and those in the first few years post-Ph.D. or other terminal degrees like M.F.A., M.S.W., D.V.M., or J.D., and will enable 25-30 participants to work on their dissertations or publications at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign hosted by the Center for Advanced Study, for one intensive week. The Institute is directed by Jane Desmond (Resident Director), Kim Marra, Margo DeMello, and Kenneth Shapiro. We are excited to announce the following special guest speakers for 2018 Institute:
    • Barbara J. King, Professor of Anthropology, College of William and Mary
    • Kim TallBear, Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Peoples, Technoscience & Environment, Associate Professor; Faculty of Native Studies, University of Alberta
    • Holly Hughes, Professor, School of Art and Design, University of Michigan
    • Bill Lynn, Research Scientist, Marsh Institute at Clark University and Research alumnus), Fellow, NewKnowledge
    • Yuka Suzuki, Associate Professor of Anthropology, Bard College
    • Chris Green, Executive Director, Harvard Law School Animal Law & Policy Program(summer resident in Urbana-Champaign and University of Illinois Additional speakers to be announced

    Application Deadline: February 15, 2018. Find out more, including details about tuition and how to apply, here.

  • CALL FOR PAPERS MARITIME ANIMALS: TELLING STORIES OF ANIMALS AT SEA

    Two-day international conference
    National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, London, UK

    April 26-27, 2019

    Keynote speakers
    Thom van Dooren
    William Gervase Clarence-Smith

    In maritime narratives of humans, ships and the sea, animals are too often absent, or marginalised in passing references, despite the fact that ships once carried, and were populated by, all kinds of animals. Horses, mules and other ‘military’ animals crossed the sea to their battlefields, while livestock were brought on-board to be killed and eaten. Sailors and passengers kept animal companions, ranging widely from cats and parrots to ferrets and monkeys. Animal stowaways, such as rats, termites and shipworms, did tremendous damage to ships’ structures and stores, especially during the age of sail. Rats also emerge from the archives as seafarers, ‘colonisers’ and explorers alongside their human counterparts. Moreover, countless animals – seabirds, dolphins, porpoises, etc. – would visit and accompany ships, filling many sea narratives with the wonder of oceanic animal encounters.

    The conference seeks to shed fresh light on maritime history by placing animals centre stage. Papers are sought which uncover all aspects of animals’ involvements (and entanglements) with ships and their activities. For instance, what roles did animals play in famous maritime episodes? What were the experiences of animals on board ships, and to what extent is it possible to recover them? In what ways were managing, sharing with, and caring for, animals important concerns of ships’ crews? What were the policies and procedures regarding keeping animals on board, and how did the presence of animals affect maritime practices? Moreover, the conference will explore the impact of sea-faring animals – whether political, economic, cultural, or environmental – as maritime activities have knitted the world ever more closely together. What roles have animals played in colonial encounters and voyages of discovery, for instance? And how have animals functioned as cultural agents as well as commodities?

    Liza Verity’s Animals at Sea (2004), a collection of animal photographs from the National Maritime Museum, has demonstrated that pets and animal mascots, affectionately regarded as shipmates, played a significant role in bringing a ship’s human community together. The conference will build on this book, while also going beyond a focus on the role of animals in mediating human shipboard communities to explore animal and human relationships at sea more widely. We call upon the power of story-telling to repopulate maritime history with animals, by telling, and listening to, surprising stories about them.

    Papers are invited on (but not limited to) the following topics:

    · Methods for recovering the shipboard experiences of animals
    · Animals on-board ship (pets, ship’s mascots, vermin, livestock, etc.)
    · Animal explorers: animals and expeditions by sea
    · Animal sightings and encounters: sea birds, dolphins, and other animal visitors
    · Politics and ethics of human-animal interactions at sea
    · Sea travellers’ tales: animal encounters in diaries, journals and ships’ newspapers
    · Visual representations of maritime animals (paintings, carvings, scrimshaw, etc.)
    · Sailors as natural historians or zoologists at sea
    · Animals and animal products for trade
    · Ports and dockyard animal stories
    · Whaling, sealing and fishing
    · Ships and animal-borne disease
    · Animal shipwreck stories
    · Animals and ships’ technologies and structures
    · Environmental impact of animals travelling by sea
    · Ship ecology and interspecies relationships
    · Animal superstitions, stories and myths
    · Differing approaches to animals across global seafaring cultures
    · Animals at sea in literature
    · Maritime animals today

    Please send a short abstract (200-300 words) for a 20 minute paper to Kaori Nagai (K.Nagai@kent.ac.uk) by May 15, 2018. 

    Call for stories
    In relation to this conference, we are soliciting maritime stories and anecdotes from members of the public, as well as from writers, artists and scholars. If you have any interesting stories of animal encounters on ships or other memorable maritime animal stories, from oral history, the archives, or elsewhere, please drop a line to K.Nagai@kent.ac.uk ; we would be excited to hear from you. Also, we’d be grateful if you could forward this call for stories to those of your friends who have experience of life at sea. We are hoping to create an online forum to share your stories. 

    Conference Organiser
    Dr. Kaori Nagai
    School of English
    University of Kent
    CT2 7NX, UK
    E-mail: K.Nagai@kent.ac.uk

  • (UN)COMMON WORLDS: CONTESTING THE LIMITS OF HUMAN-ANIMAL COMMUNITIES: Human-Animal Studies Conference. August 7-9, 2018, Turku, Finland. Humans and other animals share spaces and create communities together. They touch each other in various symbolic and material ways, constantly crossing and redrawing communal, ethical and very practical boundaries. As of late, this multifarious renegotiation of human-animal relations has sparked intense debates both in the public arena and in academia.For instance, Bruno Latour argues that the anthropocene (marking the massive human impact on ecosystems) creates a new territory in which traditional subject/object separations are no longer useful. What is called for is the transgressing or dissolving of these limits in order to "distribute agency as far and in as differentiated a way as possible" (Latour 2014, 16). Various inclusive, more-than-human notions, such as 'cosmopolitics' (Stengers 2010) or 'common worlds' (Latour 2004) are brought forward to this end. These discussions highlight what is becoming a core challenge for various disciplines and fields of study: how to live together in complex places, spaces and societies, with intersecting and overlapping borders and traces of cultures, histories and politics. Furthermore, the discussions bring forth the question of how to work against the premises of exclusive human agency and interest in order to explore and imagine multispecies futures. However, the various conceptualisations of inclusive, common worlds entail a risk of disregarding or devaluing that which is not shared: the aspects of multispecies lives that cannot be or become common but that nevertheless matter for shared existences. There is also the issue of becoming "common" - of territorialisations and inclusions of some beings to the exclusion of others. What will remain the "uncommon" (i.e. unconventional) in common worlds? Moreover, are common worlds envisaged as free of political struggles and borders? What are the politics of becoming common and remaining uncommon? With this Call we invite you to discuss and develop ideas about human-animal worlds both common and uncommon. We invite presentations from the fields including but not limited to social sciences, arts and humanities, natural and environmental sciences and law. Prospective speakers are invited to submit an abstract by February 28, 2018 (max. 250 words) to uncommonworlds2018@gmail.com (preferably as a word document or a pdf file). Please include in your submission the title of your presentation, your name, affiliation, and contact information. The organizers also invite artists to present their work. If you are interested in this option, please contact the organizers to discuss your ideas.

     



Funding

  • Internal
  • External

    • CAF is an all-volunteer-run, non-profit organization whose mission is to support artists and scholars in advancing our understanding of and commitment to animals. For more information see

    • Call for Research Proposals - The animal protection organizations Farm Sanctuary (farmsanctuary.org) and The Kimmela Center for Animal Advocacy (www.kimmela.org) announce a Call for Grant Proposals for cutting-edge noninvasive research on the complex nature of farm animal (chickens, pigs, sheep, goats, turkeys, and cows) emotions, behavior, and cognitive abilities in an approved setting (such as a farm animal sanctuary). We are particularly interested in funding rigorous innovative research which will expand our understanding of who farm animals are and how they experience their lives. Examples include studies of self-awareness, emotional and social complexity, personality, and mood and anxiety disorders such as depression or post-traumatic stress disorder. All proposals should be designed for publication in peer-reviewed journals, and the plan for peer review submission should be included in the proposal.

       How to Apply

      Grants will be awarded for amounts from $1,000–$20,000. Research proposals should include:

      • A cover letter that includes the proposal title and name of principal investigator and any co-investigators.
      • An abstract of the proposed research.
      • Rationale (background) for the study.
      • Study aims and objectives.
      • Methodology, including:
        • A detailed description of how animals will be studied.
        • Outcomes measurement techniques.
        • Analysis.
      • Potential implications or impact for our understanding, perception, and treatment of farm animals.
      • Curriculum vitae and current affiliation of the applicant. For students, this information should be provided on the advisor(s) offering guidance on the project.
      • A proposed timeline, including start date and completion date.
      • A description of the final product (e.g., a research paper), and the plans for submitting for publication and (if applicable) poster presentation(s).

      Deadline
      Proposals will be considered on a rolling basis. Research can be carried out at any time agreed upon in advance with Farm Sanctuary.

      Additional Information

      • Grant amounts depend on the scope of the project, budget justification, and significance of the study.
      • All research must take place in an approved setting, such as a farm animal sanctuary. (Farm Sanctuary has approved sanctuaries in Watkins Glen, New York; Orland, California; and Acton, California) Research settings should be ethologically and socially appropriate for the individual animal and his/her species and should not involve animals who are purchased or bred.
      • All research must be noninvasive, respectful and promote the welfare interests and choices/preferences of the animals; in other words, it must be non-coercive if it involves an intervention.
      • All research should avoid causing harm to the animals and their co-inhabitants.
      • Students are welcome, but all students must have an academic advisor and approval from their home institution.
      • Farm Sanctuary and Kimmela Center officers, directors, and employees, and the immediate family members of such officers, directors, and employees are ineligible to apply for a grant.
      • The selection committee is comprised of:
        • Hope Ferdowsian, M.D., M.P.H., Georgetown University; George Washington University.
        • Joyce D’Silva, Ambassador, Compassion in World Farming.
        • Lori Marino, Ph.D., Neuroscientist and Executive Director of The Kimmela Center for Animal Advocacy.
        • Key experts in the area under review, who will be approved by Farm Sanctuary.
      • Once the selections have been made, grantees will be required to execute a grant agreement prepared by Farm Sanctuary and The Kimmela Center and agree to abide by all terms and conditions thereof.

      Please send questions and proposals to lorimarino@kimmela.org.

    • Animal Welfare Trust
      • Animal Welfare Trust’s grant program seeks to assist organizations whose work can help alleviate animal suffering and/or raise public consciousness toward giving animals the respect they so need and deserve. Although general organizational funding will be considered, preference will be given to well-defined projects with clear goals and objectives. Capital projects will not be considered. Areas of priority include farm animal welfare, vegetarianism and humane education.
      • The deadline for applications is ongoing.
    • Farm Sanctuary
      • The animal protection organization Farm Sanctuary announces a call for grant proposals for observational research of the complex nature of farm animal (chickens, pigs, sheep, goats, turkeys, and cows) emotions, behavior, and cognitive abilities in an approved setting (such as a farm animal sanctuary). We are interested, for example, in the psychological profiles of these animals, including mood and anxiety disorders such as depression or post-traumatic stress disorder.
      • The deadline for applications is ongoing.

Job Listings

  • Internal
  • External
    • Fellowship: University of Wisconsin - Madison - Postdoctoral Fellowship on the Plantationocene
      by Brett Mizelle

      The following fellowship was posted to the H-Net Job Guide from 30 October 2017 to  6 November 2017.  These job postings are included here based on the categories selected by the list editors for H-Animal.  See the H-Net Job Guide website at
      http://www.h-net.org/jobs/ for more information.  To contact the Job Guide,
      write to jobguide@mail.h-net.msu.edu, or call +1-517-432-5134 between 9 am and 5 pm US Eastern time.

      University of Wisconsin - Madison - Postdoctoral Fellowship on the Plantationocene
      http://www.h-net.org/jobs/job_display.php?id=56015

    • There are internship opportunities through the Humane Society Institute for Science and Policy.  Please contact Andrew Rowan (arowan@hsi.org) or Carol England (cengland@humanesociety.org) for more information.   The website for HSISP is  http://www.humanesociety.org/about/departments/hsisp/#.UuvR9T1dWSo

    • Detroit Zoological Society, Animal Welfare Internships
      • The Detroit Zoological Society's Center for Zoo Animal Welfare (CZAW) is accepting applications for animal welfare interns and residents. CZAW is a resource center for captive animal welfare knowledge, research and best practices; a convener and forum for exotic animal welfare science, practice and policy discussions; and a center conducting research and training, and recognizing advances in exotic animal welfare. The research conducted through the Center represents two key areas of interest: developing additional measures of animal welfare and the effects of captive environments and management practices on welfare. Although broadly applied across species, focus is on several taxa/animal groups. The CZAW animal welfare internships and residencies are unpaid opportunities. Interns and residents will learn the processes used by researchers in the field of animal welfare while assisting in data collection and database management. If you are currently enrolled in a college or university and can receive credit, you will be considered for an internship. If you are a recent college graduate (no more than three years between graduation and start date), you will be considered for a residency.
      • The deadline for applications is ongoing.
    • Queen's University, Animal Governance Graduate Research Opportunities
      • The Lives of Animals Research Group at Queen’s University in Canada is seeking highly motivated, interdisciplinary, and adventurous graduate students interested in working on issues related to Animal Governance beginning September 2017 or 2018. Masters and/or doctoral level projects will explore the actors, knowledges, structures, practices, and outcomes that shape human engagements with and management of animals in Canada or Botswana. Projects will engage scholarship at the intersection of environmental governance, political ecology and animal geography to consider how and why particular animal governance strategies are operationalized in a particular context, and the ways in which humans and animals negotiate them as differentially empowered socio-political actors. Projects may focus on companion, domesticated or wild animals and may highlight strategies such as translocation, rehabilitation, training, monitoring, breeding, culling etc. A competitive funding package will be offered to successful candidates, including field research costs within Canada or Botswana. The successful candidate is expected to apply for external funding with support from the research group, and will have the opportunity to publish in peer-reviewed journals and present findings at academic conferences and to key stakeholders.
      • The deadline for applications is ongoing.

Miscellaneous

  • Equine History Collective Blog Seeks Reviewers
    by Katrin Boniface

    The Equine History Collective, EquineHistory.org, promotes the horse as a lens for trans-regional history, and serves as an interface for related historical research in the humanities, sciences, and social sciences. We are seeking reviewers for books (run on Sundays) and sources (run on Saturdays). The themes for upcoming months are: Racing (December), Ancient (January), and Breeding (February). Proposals for other topics are also welcome, and will run in later months.

    Submission information is available at: https://equinehistory.wordpress.com/submissions/

    Katrin Boniface

    UC Riverside, History
    katboniface.equinehistory.org
  • Animal Studies Repository of the Humane Society International is an excellent resource for animal studies scholars, see http://animalstudiesrepository.org/
  • Announcement: New PhD Program in Human-Animal Studies at the University of Canterbury

    From January 2018, the University of Canterbury in New Zealand will be offering a PhD in Human-Animal Studies. This is the first such degree offered in the Southern Hemisphere, and one of only three or four throughout the world.

    http://www.nzchas.canterbury.ac.nz/courses/phdhuan.shtml

    Students undertaking the PhD in Human-Animal Studies (PhD HUAN) at UC will work with supervisors drawn from our pool of over a dozen academic staff working in many different areas, and will be part of the lively and inclusive research culture of the New Zealand Centre for Human-Animal Studies.

    Areas for supervision include, but are not limited, to the following:
    • Associate Professor Philip Armstrong: animals in Aotearoa New Zealand and the Pacific; animals in literature; animals in history, especially the Renaissance and the Nineteenth Century; sheep in culture and history; whales and dolphins in culture and history; animals and environmental discourse.
    • Associate Professor Jane Buckingham: animals in South Asian History; elephants and elephantology.
    • Dr Douglas Campbell: animals, philosophy and environmentalism; extinction and de-extinction.
    • Nikki Evans: animals in the context of human services and social work; human-animal relationships in the aftermath of earthquakes; animal-assisted therapy; the link between animal abuse and human violence; animals and children.
    • Associate Professor Amy Fletcher: extinction and de-extinction; animals and public understandings of science and technology; animals and futurology; animals and environmental discourse.
    • Dr Rosie Ibbotson: animals in the visual arts; museology and display of human-animal relations; extinction and de-extinction.
    • Dr Piers Locke: multispecies ethnography; elephants and elephantology; interspecies care; animals and environmental discourse; humanism and post-humanism.
    • Dr Alison Loveridge: animal welfare and advocacy; animals in agriculture and food production; animals in New Zealand; animals and rural life; animals and children.
    • Dr Carolyn Mason: animals and ethics; bioethics.
    • Professor Henrietta Mondry: dogs in culture and history; animals in Russian culture and history; animals in Slavic cultures; companion species; animals in literature; de-extinction.
    • Dr Patrick O’Sullivan: animals in Ancient Greek culture and society; animals in classical literature and drama.
    • Associate Professor Annie Potts: animals in Aotearoa New Zealand and the Pacific; animals in art; human-animal relations and gender; representations of animals in horror and science fiction; chickens in culture and history; possums in culture and history; animals and emergencies; intersectionality.
    • Dr Michael-John Turp: animals and ethics; animals in Early Modern philosophy.

    To enquire about the PHD (HUAN), contact any of the following:

    NZCHAS Co-Director Associate Professor Annie Potts (annie.potts@canterbury.ac.nz),
    NZCHAS Co-Director Associate Professor Philip Armstrong (philip.armstrong@canterbury.ac.nz), or
    one of our other members: http://www.nzchas.canterbury.ac.nz/people/members.shtml.

  • Summer Retreat Program at Shin Pond, Maine for Animal/Humane/Environmental Studies
    by Bernie Unti

    Summer Retreat Program at Shin Pond, Maine

    for Animal/Humane/Environmental Studies

    The 300-acre Camp Muse at Shin Pond, Maine, is the site of a Summer Retreat Program for writers, scholars, artists, educators, and other cultural producers and knowledge workers focusing on animals and/or their humane treatment, and/or on environmental trends or threats relevant to animals and their well-being (habitat loss, climate change, land conservation, environmental degradation, inter alia).  The program, operated by The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), invites all interested parties to apply for a residency at the property, which is open between July 1 and October 3, 2017.

    Camp Muse, a wooded retreat at the edge of a pristine and peaceful pond just ten miles from the northern entrance to Baxter State Park, offers an idyllic atmosphere for research, contemplation, writing, and other creative work.  The purpose of the program, operated through the generosity of longtime HSUS board member K. William Wiseman (1921-2014) and his wife Madge, is to encourage scholarly, cultural, and practical projects relating to animals, and to provide a site for enhanced productivity on such projects.

    For views of the property, and other details, see:

    http://www.humanesociety.org/about/departments/shin_pond_retreat.html

    Applications for use of the Shin Pond property are evaluated by an ad hoc committee at The HSUS.

    There is no application form to submit, but the applicant must present: a statement of interest that includes information on the project he/she will pursue; a statement concerning the likely value or benefit of such a project to the work and mission of The HSUS and/or its affiliates; the specific work product that will be produced during the retreat period; details of the likely outcome or application of the work undertaken at the retreat; any applicable scheduling concerns or scheduling preferences; and two professional references.  Applicants may be asked to submit copies of prior publications. To maximize the use of the property and to facilitate transitioning between participants, check in/arrival time is Monday at 2 p.m. and check out time/departure is Friday at 10 a.m. 

    If approved, the applicant is expected to cover the costs of transportation to and from Shin Pond, local transportation while staying there, food, beverages, entertainment, recreational activities (including admission to nearby Baxter State Park), long distance telephone services, and all other costs connected with the applicant's use of the property. The HSUS will, however, pay for local telephone service, electrical utilities, and routine maintenance.

    Participants may take up to three household members (including spouses, significant others, and children) with them. Please note that because Camp Muse is a Humane Society Wildlife Land Trust-protected wildlife sanctuary, companion animals require specific prior approval and applicants may not be permitted to bring them.  In all events, approved cats will need to remain indoors and dogs must be leashed at all times.

     The house at Shin Pond has the amenities common to any comfortable home, including all utilities and a full complement of furniture, kitchen ware, and other household equipment.

    There is a telephone line and high-speed Internet access.  There is convenient food shopping at Shin Pond Village and the town of Patten.  The broad guidelines for the kind of work appropriate to the retreat include:

    • major intellectual projects such as a book, a chapter on an animal-related topic;
    • a case study, or an on-line course in animal studies;
    • analytical or conceptual work for a pro-animal or environmental campaign;
    • artistic, literary, or cultural projects that celebrate animals and the natural world; and
    • projects of smaller scope and/or shorter duration.  We prefer a commitment of at least two weeks.  

    Requests for use of the property for shorter periods will be given lower priority.  The property is not generally available for brief stays, e.g., an overnight or weekend visit.  Applications should be sent to Dr. Bernard Unti at The Humane Society of the United States, by mail to 1255 23rd Street, NW, Suite 450, Washington, DC 20037; by fax to 301-258-3077; or by email to bunti@humanesociety.org Applications will be received on an ongoing basis. 

  • First 100 Chimps and Last 1,000 Chimps
    • First 100 Chimps and Last 1,000 Chimps track individual chimpanzees from use in biomedical and behavioral research in the US to retirement.  The working group tasked with exploring how to implement the conclusions of the IoM committee report suggest ending most chimpanzee research. First 100 Chimps serves as a memorial to chimpanzees who have been used in research, and Last 1,000 Chimps is forward looking. The websites' creator will be tweeting updates on the status of individual chimpanzees at Lori Gruen (@last1000chimps).
  • Viral Pandas
    • The Sneezing Pandas Project is looking for contributors. An anthrozoologist and an artist have launched an ongoing and interactive online project looking at animals in the ether. What goes viral and what doesn't? What responsibilities, if any, do we have for these animals we choose to share online? These are the opening questions, but they are in no way prescriptive for the course of the research. Viral Pandas is based on a central blog: http://viralpandas.wordpress.com, but runs for a week from an art gallery producing physical artistic responses to the ideas, as well as running online across different social networks including Facebook, Pinterest, Twitter, YouTube, Digg, and G+ for the foreseeable future. Your input is welcomed. If you'd like any further information, email us at viralpandas@gmail.com.
  • Voices for Biodiversity
    • Voices for Biodiversity is a nonprofit ezine with a goal of providing a multimedia platform where citizen eco-reporters around the globe can share their stories about biodiversity and their relationships to other species and the ecosystems that support us all. The project hopes to awaken humanity to the reality that we must move away from an anthropocentric toward an eco-centric worldview to prevent the massive die-off of other species.
  • ZooScope: The Animals in Film Archive
    • Animals have played a crucial role in the development of film as an artistic medium, from the literal use of animal products in film stock to the capturing of animal movement as a driver of stop-motion, wide-screen and CGI film technology. The wish to picture animals’ lives, whether naturalistically or playfully, has led to the establishment of key genres such as wildlife film and animation. ZooScope looks at and beyond these major aspects of animals in film, covering animals’ role in film genres and styles; the range of literal and symbolic ways animals appear in film; animals in the film star-system; animal lives and the ethics of film-making; adaptation and the different challenges of filmic and literary representation of animals and human-animal relations. ZooScope is a research resource for the animal studies and film communities produced by students and academics. In addition to the open call for submissions, we are seeking partnerships with academic colleagues whose students could contribute to ZooScope. Academic partners would act as sub-editors of the site, with their students producing ZooScope entries, for example, as formal assessments (with marking and feedback taking the professional form of editorial review and assessment completion coinciding with publication). This is how the archive has developed so far, as a research collaboration between undergraduate and postgraduate students and staff at the University of Sheffield and York University in Canada. Work on ZooScope challenges students and inspires creativity, enthusiasm, scholarly rigour and professionalism.

Links

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